Christian References In William Blake's The Lamb

738 words - 3 pages

William Blake - The Lamb

William Blake's "The Lamb" is an attempt to bring up life's ultimate
questions through the voice of child-like speaker. The poem is
structured with the question as the first stanza and the answer as the
second stanza. Blake initially introduces a naive child asking simple
questions but later dives into deep philosophical theories regarding
life and creation as the child in turn tries to answer those exact
questions. "The Lamb" in trying to convey the answers to certain
philosophical questions exhibits basic Christian creedal statements
and relays certain images concerning Jesus and also tries to explain
His relation to common man.

The opening line of the poem embodies every human's curiosities
surrounding creation and the origins of human existence. The speaker
naively questions the lamb regarding its nature and also its creation.
The speaker is representing a child and childish inquiries, yet is
addressing the notions of our existence that every person questions at
one point or another, be it a child or an adult. The childish inquires
carry on as the speaker mentions if the lamb knows who "Gave thee
clothing of delight [and] Gave thee such a tender voice." The poem is
enveloped in a sea of naivety as well as humor as the speaker is
directly speaking with an animal seeking profound philosophical
clarification concerning similar questions that all humans have
contemplated at one point in their life and have been unable to
answer. The child's question: "Who made thee," is a relatively simple
question, yet evokes a complicated and complex train of thought that
will ultimately fail to provide to convincing explanation.

As the reader continues on past the first stanza, the reader is able
to notice a shift in the speaker's approach to his opening questions.
Initially, the poem depicts what is seemingly a set of childish
inquiries yet with further reading, it is revealed that the speaker
invokes these questions with no desire of an answer, but in actuality
to respond to those specific questions. The speaker deceives the
reader in the first stanza as the true intent behind his inquiries.
The sole motivation of the speaker is to invoke curiosity from the
lamb. Blake uses the lamb as a symbol representing all of creation
specifically humans. As the child intends on answering the lamb's
question, Blake also intends on answering the questions of his
readers. By evoking curiosity into the origins of life, it...

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