From "A Doll's House" Character Analysis Of Nora Helmer.

1923 words - 8 pages

Today, a reader might find it hard to imagine how daring Nora Helmer was a hundred years ago. The theme of women's liberation makes this story seem almost contemporary. "A Doll's House" displayed a controversial topic, featuring a woman seeking individuality. It was written well ahead of its time when it, was considered an outrage for a woman such as Nora to display a mind of her own. It was unthinkable that a woman could leave her husband to obtain freedom. Henrik Ibsen shows us the story of a woman recapturing her strength and self-confidence. Nora begins a very hard and difficult search for her self esteem and self worth - one that she has never experienced before - through relationships with her husband and her friends. "A Doll's House" is a play about the need for a woman to feel freedom- freedom from her husband's control, from her role in society, her role as a mother figure; the problems presented still appear in today's society.One of "A Doll's House's" central themes is secession from society. It is demonstrated by several of its characters breaking away from the social standards of their time and acting on their own terms. The one character that best fits this description is Nora Helmer. Nora is an extremely fascinating character in this play. She goes through many changes and develops more than any other character. Throughout the play, she has grown from a wife, dependent on her husband, to an independent woman who is out on a mission to educate herself and make a living for herself. During the beginning of the play, she is a grown woman that has been pampered all her life by men, including her father and her husband. She describes that she feels like a doll, always dressing up and performing dances for everybody, "I lived by performing tricks for you, Torvald [...] But our house has been nothing but a play room. Here I have been your doll-wife, just as at home I used to be papa's doll-child [...] I thought it fun when you played with me[...] That has been our marriage, Torvald" (204). She trusts in Torvald unquestionably, holds the same opinions as he does- just so that she won't have to speak her own opinions, in case they were different. She loves him so much that nothing else matters; she has no social, legal, or moral considerations. She is the perfect image of a doll wife who acts subordinate to her husband. Nora goes through life with the illusion that everything is perfect. Because of the society she grew up in, when Nora is placed in a responsible position that demands moral judgment, she has none to give, as demonstrated in the situation in which she forges her father's signature- after he deceases.Slowly, Nora's character is forced to discontinue the role of a doll and seek out her individuality. As a mother and a wife, Nora Helmer has duties and responsibilities to her family. She progressively confronts the realties of the real world, but still clings to the hope that her husband will protect and defend her from the...

Find Another Essay On From "A Doll's House"- character analysis of Nora Helmer.

The Character of Nora in Act 1 of A Doll's House

547 words - 2 pages ". However, within moments she is forced into pleading "Mr. Krogstad, I don't have any influence."Nora's stereotyped roll as a doll confined to a doll's house constantly being fathered by Torvald encourages her childlike manner. However an entirely different contradicting side to Nora's character is revealed when Nora explains exactly what she did "for Helmer". Although Nora is a woman who shirks or is probably unaware of her responsibilities

The Awakening of Nora in Ibsen's A Doll's House

1071 words - 4 pages The Awakening of Nora in Ibsen's A Doll's House    The status of women in the 1800's, when A Doll's House was written, was that of a second-class citizen.  Women did not have the right to vote, own property, or make legal transactions.  The role of women was restricted to that of a housewife.          In A Doll's House, Ibsen does a wonderful job of presenting the character of Nora as person who goes though an awakening about her

The Rebellion of Nora in Ibsen's A Doll's House

1371 words - 5 pages The Rebellion of Nora in A Doll's House       A Doll's House, by Henrik Ibsen, was written during a time when the role of woman was that of comforter, helper, and supporter of man. The play generated great controversy due to the fact that it featured a female protagonist seeking individuality.   A Doll's House was one of the first plays to introduce woman as having her own purposes and goals. The heroine, Nora Helmer, progresses during the

Comparison of Nora (A Doll's House) and Mrs.Alving (Ghosts)

750 words - 3 pages into exile and away for a little bit, and Mrs. Alving saved her son by sending him into exile or at least away from their home so that Oswald would never have to grow up with his freelancing father.There were also some key differences between Nora and Mrs. Alving. In "A Doll's House", the reason of the union between Nora and Helmer relied on the husband's conception of integrity and unyielding devotion to social morality. He was the conventional

A Doll's House ACT I: Character Analysis

941 words - 4 pages eating macaroons. Her husband, Torvald, enters and a conversation that arises is the first time we witness Nora lying to her husband occurs. In this conversation we learn that Nora is a spendthrift. We become aware of this by the many packages she has carried in her house and how Torvald confronts her with her problem. Nora even asks for money for Christmas instead of presents.Later, Nora's childhood friend, Mrs. Linde, arrives. The two quickly catch

An examination of Nora, from "A Doll's House" and Rose-Anna, from "The Tin Flute" as wives

1683 words - 7 pages he like Torvald is out of way of possibly feeling indebted to his wife. Her work ethic cannot be matched by any other characters in either "The Tin Flute" or "A Doll's House". Whereas Nora is forced to work hard to pay off the loan, Rose-Anna is motivated more out of the necessity to get tasks done, but they both work hard for the sake of their husbands. Nora tries to protect the name of her husband from the shame of her forgery and Rose-Anna

The Origin of Emma and Nora, From Henrik Ibsens "A doll's house" and Gustave Flaubert's "Madame Bovary"

1124 words - 4 pages ahappy ending. Some people in Norway even attributed the rising divorce rate tothis play! What is it that drove both of these authors to be such harsh socialcritics? What exactly were their views? And what drove these two authors tocreate two of their most famous characters: Nora, from "A Dolls House", andEmma from Madame Bovary? An insight into the background of these authorsreveals that both Nora and Emma are reflections of social and political

Henrik Ibsen "A Doll's House": Explore how the minor characters are used with regard to plot development revealing aspects of the character of Nora, and thematic issues

1029 words - 4 pages ". One detects an ignorance concerning the "outside world", as, together with her husband, they have created a sort of artificial environment within their home. Helmer is the one in charge of their affairs, and she is his entertainment, this is shown by statements like "is that my skylark twittering out there?" and "when did my squirrel come home". The use of pet names gives an image of an animal trapped in its cage. As Nora hears about Mrs

Analysis of the Character of Mrs. Linde in A Doll's House

1251 words - 5 pages The American author Napoleon Hill once stated “think twice before you speak, because your words and influence will plant the seed of either success or failure in the mind of another.” In Henrick Ibsen’s play A Doll’s House, the character of Mrs. Linde contributes to the exposition and pivotal moment of the decideding factors of Krogstad, she also has a profound influence on the character development of Nora Helmer. Mrs. Linde directly

Essay Comparing Louise of Story of an Hour and Nora of A Doll's House

1952 words - 8 pages Comparing Louise of The Story of an Hour and Nora of A Doll's House   In Kate Chopin's "The Story of an Hour," the main character is a woman who has been controlled and conformed to the norms of society. Louise Mallard has apparently given her entire life to assuring her husband's happiness while forfeiting her own. This truth is also apparent in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House. In this story, Nora Helmer has also given her life to a man

Nora: An Extraordinary "Doll" in "A Doll's House"

1351 words - 5 pages Nora, the wife of Torvald Helmer and mother of three children, plays a fundamental role within Henrik Ibsen's "A Doll's House," published in 1879. Nora's character demonstrates typical characteristics of the `average woman' during the 1870's and 1880's. Women were not regarded as equals according to men; however women did have a large impact on the economy. This was caused by large sums of money spent on several garments, costumes, and

Similar Essays

Character Development Of Nora From A Doll's House

1243 words - 5 pages Character Development of Nora from A Doll's House Ibsen's character development of Nora is represented by animal imagery. From the beginning of the play, we notice Ibsen's use of animals to describe Nora. In the opening lines, Torvald says, "Is that my little lark twittering out there?" (Wilke 1139). Webster's defines "lark" as a songbird and to play or frolic (Guralnik 340). The reader automatically gets an image of Nora as a carefree

The Heroic Nora Helmer In Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House

2683 words - 11 pages The Heroic Nora Helmer in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House   What does it mean to be a hero?  According to Webster, a hero is someone "of great strength [and] courage" who is "admired" for his or her "courage and nobility."1  Stretching this definition a bit further, I would argue that a hero is someone who uses this strength, courage, and nobility to help or save others.  Nora Helmer, in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House, leaves her husband

The Character Of Torvald Helmer And Nils Krogstad In A Doll's House

1507 words - 6 pages Torvald Helmer is the least likeable character in A Doll's House, a play by Henrik Ibsen. Torvald is sometimes portrayed as a sexist pig. Such a reading does an injustice to Torvald. There is more depth to his character if one follows the hints that he had actively covered up for Nora's father. The first hint came when Nora told Kristina that Torvald had given up his government post because there was no prospect of advancement. It may be

Nora Helmer In Ibsen's A Doll House

1176 words - 5 pages attempting suicide because the rules of society outside of the Helmer house, were simply too much for her to obtain. In the ending scene Torvald declares, “You are talking like a child. You understand nothing about the society you live in.” And Nora responds, “No, I don’t but I shall go into that too. I must try to discover who is right, society or me” (840). This is where Ibsen’s original ending can be denied. In Nora’s response quote, there is
Final Concert 15th International Henryk Wieniawski Competition 2016. | To the Moon and Back | MAMA 2017 Mashup