Fulfilling The Prophecy Of Brave New World

918 words - 4 pages

Fulfilling the Prophecy of Brave New World  

"Community, Identity, Stability" is the motto of the World State in the Brave New World by Aldous Huxley, a state intent on keeping itself intact. In the stable state, the people must be happy with the status quo; they must not be able to imagine a better world, and must not think of a worse one. In the stable state, a few people must be able to cope with unexpected change, but they should be unable to initiate it. In the stable state, the population must have certain proportions of satisfied citizens and innovators that can coexist.

The United States has already succeeded in creating the ideal population distribution - that of an iceberg, keeping nine tenths of the population below the waterline of the ocean of consumer culture, and barely one tenth above. In this field, this nation surpasses the World State: the American status quo appears to be maintained by perfectly natural forces. The US does not use the fetal alcohol syndrome, bokanovskification, or hypnopedia to manipulate its population. Instead, it utilizes the human tendency to absorb and accept the traditions of the society for conditioning, allows fluid social mobility to distribute people to their proper places in society, and gives a wide choice of amusements to occupy the time and spare the people unnecessary and painful thought on their condition.

The American waterline is defined by the culture of the country; the American waterline defines the necessities for happiness and the necessity of happiness. Some of the essentials of happiness today include a car, a TV set, a stereo, and mass media access twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. Another integral part of happiness is the freedom to improve one's lot. The people consider both kinds of happiness quite necessary. If one lacks in such happiness, one also lacks in the diligence needed to acquire it, and thus clearly lacks in worth as a member of the greatest nation on this planet. This country's majority is free to do nearly anything it may want, and free to choose what it is free to do insofar as allowed by a representative democracy; accordingly, it defines its own principles of happiness, and keeps itself submerged. The immersed public makes the decisions concerning how and what the government does, and hence has its happiness fairly provided for.

In the American system of social stability, artificial physical impairment of human stock is not necessary, for the system itself sorts the people out and arranges them on the social ladder. This is a far more efficient design, allowing maximization of the society's production; this policy also carries a small additional benefit of being ethical.

The staple definition of happiness accommodates a good middle seventy percent of the...

Find Another Essay On Fulfilling the Prophecy of Brave New World

Brave New World: The Destruction of Family

1552 words - 6 pages Is the push for a perfect utopia enough to siphon motherhood, family, and love? As in Brave New World, Aldous Huxley illustrates the destruction of the idea of family in this ’perfect world‘. People in the world today have the ability to express love and obtain a family. Huxley explores the futuristic outlook on a world (in many ways similar to ours) that would not allow such humanistic traits. Science is so called the ’father of progress’ and

analysis of Brave new world

1503 words - 6 pages issue anymore.ConclusionThe futuristic view in "brave new world" shown in world state society is hard to imagine by today's people even impossible when the novel was written, a society without any love or any passion just a group of people living with artificial foods and working like robots, society where family has no meaning, but the fact that in today's U.S.A one third of children don't have any father, it might not be hard to imagine when

Questioning the Brave New World

1246 words - 5 pages The book opens on the factory floor of the reproduction plant. What do they make here? Humans. Here in this muti-level factories people are made, not just the bodies but the minds too. In this “Brave New World” Aldous Huxley created babies are decanted not born. The cast system is no longer a frame of mind it is the devilment, mass cloning and use of chemicals to mutate or under develop embryos was used to create classes of people that could be

The Possibilities of Brave New World in Our Society

1123 words - 5 pages . It all starts with the genetic modification of bacteria leading up to genetically modified humans, and then eventually having children being conceived in test tubes. All these studies, experiments, and inventions being done today are the stepping stones to a controlled society in Brave New World. Genetic modification in our world all started with the genetic modification of bacteria according to Theresa Philips of Nature Publishing Group

Comparing the Philosophies of Brave New World and Anthem

1199 words - 5 pages The Philosophies Brave New World and Anthem     The books Brave New World by Aldus Huxley and Anthem by Ayn Rand are both valuable twentieth-century contributions to literature. Both books explore the presence of natural law in man and propose a warning for what could happen when man's sense of right and wrong is taken from him. In this essay, I hope to show how these seemingly unrelated novels both expound upon a single, very profound

The Delusion of Happiness in Brave New World and Canada

1720 words - 7 pages Abraham Lincoln once said, “Folks are usually about as happy as they make their minds up to be.” Thus, implying happiness can be determined by ones mindset. However, Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World creates a vision of a utopian society that achieves happiness by altering the mindset of its populace to believe they are happy. In a society depicting such a strange ideology of the future, people are no longer as happy as they make their minds up

The Possibilities of Brave New World in our Society

1092 words - 5 pages requires. For instance, the Alphas are set to believe that they have the best jobs, whereas the Epsilons believe that their jobs are better because they don’t have work as hard as the other castes. The science and technology within Brave New World is what makes this society possible. The science and technology being invented today have the potential of our real world society ending up much like the society in Brave New World. Starting with the study

Significance of the Plot within Brave New World

1135 words - 5 pages authors may choose to follow. Aldous Huxley takes a unique approach to his plot in Brave New World, intermixing different plot types, most notably the progressive and episodic plot, to enhance his novel and make it as effective as possible. Huxley utilizes these plot types to provide insight into his characters, allowing the reader to view them in different situations, while managing to connect all of the different occurrences together to form a

Comparison of "The Giver" and "Brave New World"

708 words - 3 pages What one may think of as being a Utopia could be a dystopia to another. Lowis Lowry’s 1993 novel “The Giver” may seem like a remake of the 1932 “Brave New World” by Aldous Huxley given their similar plot lines, but these two novels also have their differences. Jonas and Bernard, the protagonists of the novels, both have an intelligence that wants to know more, that wants to know what is outside of this Utopian place they live in. Both Lowry and

The Role of Women in Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World

654 words - 3 pages asserts the beliefs of male dominance and authority over women. Aldous Huxley’s novel, Brave New World, introduces the reader to an “ideal” society set in the future, 632 years after Ford’s death. The society is controlled by a World State that asserts its beliefs through hypnopaedia conditioning. The feminist theory is a type of criticism that analyzes the ideologies of a patriarchal social system within various texts. This essay will strive to

The Dystopian Society of Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley

1416 words - 6 pages A dystopia is an imaginary, imperfect place where those who dwell are faced with terrible circumstances. The novel Brave New World by Aldous Huxley illustrates the concept of a dystopia. A utopia is an ideal place where everything is perfect, but in the novel, it becomes apparent that the author is trying to demonstrate the negative effects on a society when it attempts to become an unreachable utopian society. Brave New World is seen as a

Similar Essays

Brave New World: Argumentative Paragraph The People Of Brave New

539 words - 2 pages Brave New World: Argumentative Paragraph The people of Brave New World are not aware of the truth, because most of the time they are on the drug soma. At a young age they are conditioned to think what the society wants them to think, resulting in a false "utopia". This is the one topic which I feel encompasses many of the major themes in this novel. There are many situations where the author, Aldous Huxley, will show the readers how

The Brave New World Essay

1511 words - 6 pages Literature – as any bookworm will say – is not simply the art of writing. Literature is the Rembrandt of storytelling, the Einstein of language and the Clint Eastwood of action. Literature is not simply a story: literature is a great story. One of the most potent traits of great literature is applicability to the life of the reader. This quality is what sets Brave New World¬ by Aldus Huxley apart from many others: applicability to human society

The Brave New World Essay

1081 words - 4 pages In the beginning of "Brave New World", the Director of Hatcheries and Conditioning (DHC) leads a group of students through the "Central London Hatchery and Conditioning Centre" to give them an idea of the society and how it is kept stable.The World State was created after the Nine Years War. Its motto is "Community, Identity, Stability". Ford, as the father of mass production, replaces God, and so the introduction of his first T-Model was chosen

Brave New World: Idea Of The Future

1176 words - 5 pages place was named the Neo-Pavlovian Conditioning rooms (Huxley) Many technological advances made huge influences in the writing of Brave New World. Lastly, the main discovery of human engineering was inspired by Hans Spemann. In the 1930s he developed a way of manipulating a human fetus while in the womb. This caused the eugenics movement that limited child bearing. Huxley showed a way of creating multiple humans from only one embryo. In the
com.oliversride.tictactoe | HD 720 The Clovehitch Killer | Verina Banks