Nora And Torvald In The Doll's House

1554 words - 6 pages

Judith Vinod
Mrs.Cassa
English III
25 May 2015
People cannot survive on their own in this world, so they form relationships. Relationships play an important role in a person's life; it influences and defines one's character and ideals. It can make someone the happiest person in the world or the most miserable. In order to establish a stable and long lasting relationship, there must be proper communication at the base of this bond. The rules of proper communication include: listening to each other, understanding the other person's emotions and needs, truthfully expressing one's view's, and supporting each other during times of adversity. In Henrick Ibsen's play, A Doll's House, he uses the character development of Nora Helmer, the protagonist, and Torvald Helmer, the antagonist, to emphasize the importance of communication in a healthy relationship.
A Doll’s House was published in 1879 in Norway. Women of that time were expected to be good mothers and wives. They were expected to take care of the domestic responsibilities, while the men took care of business and dominated the home (Historical Content). Most husbands tended to dismisses their wives opinions as insignificant. This narrow-minded thinking led to disrespect and inequality in a marriage. Respect, equality, trust, loyalty, and most importantly love are create a healthy relationship. These qualities can be achieved through communication. The marriage of Torvald and Nora reflects a typical marriage of the nineteenth century. Through the relationship of Nora and Torvald, Henrick Ibsen explores the detrimental effect of a relationship that lacks communication and respect. By illustrating an unsatisfactory marriage, he hopes to inspire the audience to view women as equals and to change the status quo of relationships.
As the play opens, Nora and Torvald's relationship is introduced as playful and flirtatious. Torvald uses endearing but demeaning nicknames to address Nora, such as, "little skylark", "little featherhead", "little squirrel, and "little spendthrift" (Act I). These animal names set a playful tone, while the repetition of the word "little" set a condescending tone. The condescending tone implies that Torvald is a male chauvininist. He believes women, especially his wife, should be "little[er]" than him. He thinks women are incapable of handling the outside world, and that they constantly need guidance, like a child. As Nora exhaustively says, "Pooh! We can borrow [the money] until then", she perfectly fits Torvald's stereotype of women by taking a childish persona. Nora lack of care about how the money is handled, displays her frivolous character. Her mostly short sentences that end with exclamation marks emphasize her child like excitement. This attitude makes her submissive in the relationship on her own will. Torvald's and Nora's juxtaposing characters accentuate the inequality in the marriage. The playful tone set by these characteristics implies that...

Find Another Essay On Nora and Torvald in The Doll's House

Nora: An Extraordinary "Doll" in "A Doll's House"

1351 words - 5 pages Nora, the wife of Torvald Helmer and mother of three children, plays a fundamental role within Henrik Ibsen's "A Doll's House," published in 1879. Nora's character demonstrates typical characteristics of the `average woman' during the 1870's and 1880's. Women were not regarded as equals according to men; however women did have a large impact on the economy. This was caused by large sums of money spent on several garments, costumes, and

How Nora was a victim and victimizer in A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen

1070 words - 4 pages It is easy to forget how far our society has come in the last hundred years in recognizing the equality of all people. Often when we take a look into the past what we see is very shocking. Such is the case in a Doll House by Henrik Ibsen. Here we see Nora presented as a victim of her father and male dominated society; however she also plays the role of victimizer against her husband, family, and friends. As Nora takes both sides of the conflict

Sympathy for Nora in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House

2008 words - 8 pages Sympathy for Nora in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House In "A Doll's House," Henrik Ibsen primarily addresses issues not only relating to women in Norway, but to women embarking on twentieth century life in general. To achieve his desired effect, he employs the use of contextual dialog and places Nora as the central character, which gives her a great edge. Because of her prominent role throughout the play, she becomes familiar, and what is

The Character of Nora in Act 1 of A Doll's House

547 words - 2 pages The character of Nora, of Isben's A Doll's House, is particularly difficult to interpret. Her character is constructed by the combination of a number of varying traits. Throughout Act 1 her ambiguity is particularly prominent. Her frivolous, playful moments are readily followed by moments of practicality and astuteness. It is not surprising that Nora is such a changeable character for she is constantly interchanging between three main roles: a

Comparison of Nora (A Doll's House) and Mrs.Alving (Ghosts)

750 words - 3 pages Nora and Mrs. Alving are two main characters in Ibsen's plays. They are similar in some ways, but obviously they are both uniquely diverse. They play many of the same roles in their plays, and are probably the most similar two characters between "Ghosts" and "A Doll's House."Nora is a unique character, a kind not usually seen in most plays. She swings her mood often; she is either very happy or very depressed, comfortable or desperate, wise or

The Origin of Emma and Nora, From Henrik Ibsens "A doll's house" and Gustave Flaubert's "Madame Bovary"

1124 words - 4 pages Gustave Flaubert and Henrik Ibsen are both known as great writers andharsh social critics. In fact when Flauberts masterpiece Madame Bovary wasreleased, he was arrested on the grounds that his novel was morally andreligiously offensive to the public, despite the fact that it was a bestseller. AlsoHenrik Ibsens "A Doll's House" was such a slap in the face to many Europeansthat it was banned in some countries and revised in Germany so that it had

An examination of Nora, from "A Doll's House" and Rose-Anna, from "The Tin Flute" as wives

1683 words - 7 pages he like Torvald is out of way of possibly feeling indebted to his wife. Her work ethic cannot be matched by any other characters in either "The Tin Flute" or "A Doll's House". Whereas Nora is forced to work hard to pay off the loan, Rose-Anna is motivated more out of the necessity to get tasks done, but they both work hard for the sake of their husbands. Nora tries to protect the name of her husband from the shame of her forgery and Rose-Anna

Mrs. Linde as a Foil for Nora in in Ibsen's A Doll's House

1651 words - 7 pages Mrs. Linde as a Foil for Nora in A Doll's House Random House Webster's dictionary defines a foil as "a person or thing that makes another seem better by contrast."  This essay will focus on the use of the foil to contrast another character. The characters of Nora and Mrs. Linde provide an excellent example of this literary device. Mrs. Linde's aged, experienced personality is the perfect foil for Nora's childish nature. Mrs. Linde's hard

Nora Perceived by Other Characters in "A doll's house" by Ibsen

2789 words - 11 pages not love for the sake of money - in other words she too had her doll house" (Hornby 99). For most of her life, Christine was responsible for someone. She never had the luxury of depending upon anyone and therefore became more cynical of the world.As Christine gets better acquainted with Nora she begins to realize that Nora is not what she seems; Instead her true inner feelings and thoughts are smothered by Torvald¹s domineering views. When

Essay Comparing Louise of Story of an Hour and Nora of A Doll's House

1952 words - 8 pages Comparing Louise of The Story of an Hour and Nora of A Doll's House   In Kate Chopin's "The Story of an Hour," the main character is a woman who has been controlled and conformed to the norms of society. Louise Mallard has apparently given her entire life to assuring her husband's happiness while forfeiting her own. This truth is also apparent in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House. In this story, Nora Helmer has also given her life to a man

Character Development of Nora from A Doll's House

1243 words - 5 pages Character Development of Nora from A Doll's House Ibsen's character development of Nora is represented by animal imagery. From the beginning of the play, we notice Ibsen's use of animals to describe Nora. In the opening lines, Torvald says, "Is that my little lark twittering out there?" (Wilke 1139). Webster's defines "lark" as a songbird and to play or frolic (Guralnik 340). The reader automatically gets an image of Nora as a carefree

Similar Essays

The Character Of Torvald Helmer And Nils Krogstad In A Doll's House

1507 words - 6 pages Torvald Helmer is the least likeable character in A Doll's House, a play by Henrik Ibsen. Torvald is sometimes portrayed as a sexist pig. Such a reading does an injustice to Torvald. There is more depth to his character if one follows the hints that he had actively covered up for Nora's father. The first hint came when Nora told Kristina that Torvald had given up his government post because there was no prospect of advancement. It may be

The Heroic Nora Helmer In Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House

2683 words - 11 pages and family at the end of the play-a move that can be viewed as either very selfish or very heroic.  Because Nora uses her strength and courage in effort to save others and herself from the false "doll's house" life they are living in, her final act of leaving home is truly heroic.  Nora saves her children from being raised by a mother who doesn't know the first thing about being a mother and she saves Torvald by no longer enabling him to

The Awakening Of Nora In Ibsen's A Doll's House

1071 words - 4 pages happy even if they were not happy themselves.  In the play, Nora mentions the way she was treated when she was living at home in her father's house.  She is raised no to have her own identity. Nora: Yes, it's true now, Torvald.  When I lived at home with Papa, he told me all his opinions, so I had the same ones too; or if they were different I hid them, since he wouldn't have care for that.  He used to call me his doll-child, and he played with

The Rebellion Of Nora In Ibsen's A Doll's House

1371 words - 5 pages The Rebellion of Nora in A Doll's House       A Doll's House, by Henrik Ibsen, was written during a time when the role of woman was that of comforter, helper, and supporter of man. The play generated great controversy due to the fact that it featured a female protagonist seeking individuality.   A Doll's House was one of the first plays to introduce woman as having her own purposes and goals. The heroine, Nora Helmer, progresses during the
The Cry - Season 1 | El Capitan (The Captain) [BluRay Rip][AC3 5 1 Castellano][2018][ | Computer Data Storage - 882 Words