The Awakening Of Nora In Ibsen's A Doll's House

1071 words - 4 pages

The Awakening of Nora in Ibsen's A Doll's House

   The status of women in the 1800's, when A Doll's House was written, was that of a second-class citizen.  Women did not have the right to vote, own property, or make legal transactions.  The role of women was restricted to that of a housewife.          In A Doll's House, Ibsen does a wonderful job of presenting the character of Nora as person who goes though an awakening about her life.  In the beginning, she concerns herself only with being a perfect wife and mother according to the social norms of the time.  Later, she realizes that she cannot continue just being her husband's shadow.  Eventually, she decides that she has duties to herself that are above of those of being a wife.  She confronts the fact that she's not complete being the way that her husband, society and the church want for her to be.

            Ibsen exposes the fact that Nora's self image has been molded by the men of her life.  First, she is a doll-child ... then a doll-bride.  She's a little play toy for the men - a beautiful possession to show off to their friends.  This presents the reality of women in the 1800's.  Women were often treated as objects by men.

            Little girls were raised to be good mothers and wives.  They were taught their role was to make their families happy even if they were not happy themselves.  In the play, Nora mentions the way she was treated when she was living at home in her father's house.  She is raised no to have her own identity.

Nora: Yes, it's true now, Torvald.  When I lived at home with Papa, he told me all his opinions, so I had the same ones too; or if they were different I hid them, since he wouldn't have care for that.  He used to call me his doll-child, and he played with me the way I played with my dolls.  Then I came into your house - (11. 589-594)

            When Nora grows up, she gets married and goes from her father hands to that of her husband's who treats he in a similar way as her father did (11. 596-597.)  She becomes the perfect wife and mother.  She pleases her husband in every way possible.  She doesn't contradict his opinion.  She still doesn't have an identity and is just the wife of Tovald Helmer.  She builds her entire world around him and believes he is her hero who will always protect her as if she were a delicate flower.  She puts her children and husband before herself.  She believes, she only has value if she is a "good mother and wife."  For the happiness of her family, she would risk anything.  Towards this goal, she takes the chance of borrowing money without the consent of a man and forges her father's signature to save her husband's life.  She only wants to protect the beautiful home they have together.

Nora:... - Torvald, with all his masculine pride - how painfully humiliating for him if found out he was in debt to me.  That would just ruin our relationship.  Our beautiful, happy home would never be the same. ...

Find Another Essay On The Awakening of Nora in Ibsen's A Doll's House

The Role of Realism in Ibsen's, A Doll's House

724 words - 3 pages Is “A Doll’s House” simply another text in which the composer questions the ideals of his society? Or is it advocating the rights of women as individuals, perhaps a pioneer in feminist literature? One may argue that “A Doll’s House” is nothing more than a product of Henrik Ibsen’s examination of his contemporary society’s values and morals, specifically those of the bourgeois class. But Ibsen does more than simply reflect upon these values and

Mrs. Linde as a Foil for Nora in in Ibsen's A Doll's House

1651 words - 7 pages Mrs. Linde as a Foil for Nora in A Doll's House Random House Webster's dictionary defines a foil as "a person or thing that makes another seem better by contrast."  This essay will focus on the use of the foil to contrast another character. The characters of Nora and Mrs. Linde provide an excellent example of this literary device. Mrs. Linde's aged, experienced personality is the perfect foil for Nora's childish nature. Mrs. Linde's hard

Nora Helmer in Ibsen's A Doll House

1176 words - 5 pages attempting suicide because the rules of society outside of the Helmer house, were simply too much for her to obtain. In the ending scene Torvald declares, “You are talking like a child. You understand nothing about the society you live in.” And Nora responds, “No, I don’t but I shall go into that too. I must try to discover who is right, society or me” (840). This is where Ibsen’s original ending can be denied. In Nora’s response quote, there is

Nora's Discovery of Self in Ibsen's A Doll's House

1422 words - 6 pages Nora's Discovery of Self in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House       Ibsen's play, "A Doll House," involves a woman who begins the play as a common housewife and through a series of joyous occurrences and catastrophes becomes a self-liberating woman.  Nora Helmer is transformed and decides to abandon her family and home in search of her true self.  She arrives at this point because of several factors.  Her refusal to submit to her husband and

An Analysis of Irony in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House

765 words - 3 pages In Henrik Ibsen's play A Doll's House, Torvald and his wife, Nora, live a middle class, conservative life with three children. Nora stays at home while Torvald works as a manager at a bank. Previously, when Torvald was sick, Nora forged her father's signature on a bond to receive money for a trip to Italy so Torvald could recover. Only Nils Krogstad, another man at the bank, and Nora's best friend, Linde, know about her terrible secret. Linde

Price of Freedom in Ibsen's A Doll's House

1342 words - 5 pages consider worth fighting for. In Henrik Ibsen's play A Doll House, every character suffers a disaster or mistake which causes them to lose some of their freedoms. However, in the quest to regain their freedoms, every character in a way gains more freedom than they thought possible. Nora suffers the most of all of the characters during the play's duration and she has the most to gain and the most to lose. Each character suffers in some way

Nora and Torvald in The Doll's House

1554 words - 6 pages . The rules of proper communication include: listening to each other, understanding the other person's emotions and needs, truthfully expressing one's view's, and supporting each other during times of adversity. In Henrick Ibsen's play, A Doll's House, he uses the character development of Nora Helmer, the protagonist, and Torvald Helmer, the antagonist, to emphasize the importance of communication in a healthy relationship. A Doll’s House was

Portrayal Of Sexism In Ibsen's The Doll's House

1440 words - 6 pages macaroons and must do so on the sly—which she clearly resents. Additionally, when Torvald addresses Nora, he belittles her by constantly bringing up her lack of responsibility with money. Depending on the translation, Nora is “spendthrift,” “prodigal,” and “little moneybags.” All of these terms, spoken affectionately, are passively aggressive. A Doll's House has few stage directions indicating tone of voice, so there is a great deal of freedom in

The Character of Nora in Act 1 of A Doll's House

547 words - 2 pages The character of Nora, of Isben's A Doll's House, is particularly difficult to interpret. Her character is constructed by the combination of a number of varying traits. Throughout Act 1 her ambiguity is particularly prominent. Her frivolous, playful moments are readily followed by moments of practicality and astuteness. It is not surprising that Nora is such a changeable character for she is constantly interchanging between three main roles: a

Portrayal of Gender Roles in the 19th Century in Ibsen's A Doll's House

968 words - 4 pages one harnessing the power in the relationship. When Torvald says "my little squirrel" he is suggesting that he in fact owns Nora and that she is second-rate to him, since she is seen as little and as a squirrel which are usually frightened, non-threatening creatures. Torvald sees women as both child-like, helpless creatures detached from reality and who are responsible for taking care of the chores and children while staying inside the house

Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House

954 words - 4 pages Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House Ibsens's play is a modern tragedy which functions on two levels, questioning the established social order of the day and presenting the death of a marriage. Both these events create a great deal of tension, and combined with the language and actions used by the characters, make the play very intense. The main cause of dramatic tension throughout the play is the way that the difference between the real

Similar Essays

The Rebellion Of Nora In Ibsen's A Doll's House

1371 words - 5 pages The Rebellion of Nora in A Doll's House       A Doll's House, by Henrik Ibsen, was written during a time when the role of woman was that of comforter, helper, and supporter of man. The play generated great controversy due to the fact that it featured a female protagonist seeking individuality.   A Doll's House was one of the first plays to introduce woman as having her own purposes and goals. The heroine, Nora Helmer, progresses during the

The Heroic Nora Helmer In Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House

2683 words - 11 pages The Heroic Nora Helmer in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House   What does it mean to be a hero?  According to Webster, a hero is someone "of great strength [and] courage" who is "admired" for his or her "courage and nobility."1  Stretching this definition a bit further, I would argue that a hero is someone who uses this strength, courage, and nobility to help or save others.  Nora Helmer, in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House, leaves her husband

Sympathy For Nora In Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House

2008 words - 8 pages Sympathy for Nora in Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House In "A Doll's House," Henrik Ibsen primarily addresses issues not only relating to women in Norway, but to women embarking on twentieth century life in general. To achieve his desired effect, he employs the use of contextual dialog and places Nora as the central character, which gives her a great edge. Because of her prominent role throughout the play, she becomes familiar, and what is

The Lie In Ibsen's A Doll's House

1852 words - 7 pages .   Secrets are a major portion in Ibsen's play A Doll's House.  He demonstrates how they are used in order to protect or help someone and the fact that they are usually brought to the surface sooner or later.  The surface of Nora's secrets resulted in her freedom.  The motivation behind the secrets in the beginning was to protect Torvald.  Ironically, when they were revealed, Nora was slapped in the face with reality.  The very thing she was
Recorder and Randsell | 4+ (Schweiz) | Who killed Tupac?